Menu Close

Crocodiles

Crocodiles

They are the biggest reptiles on Earth

Saltwater crocodiles are the biggest reptiles in the world. They can grow up to 6.17 meters (20 feet 3 in) and can weigh more than a ton. Measured at 20 ft 3 in (6.17 m), and weighed 2,370 lbs (1,075 kg), Lolong was the biggest crocodile ever measured. He died in captivity at around 8 pm on 10 February 2013, due to pneumonia and cardiac arrest, which was aggravated by a fungus infection and stress.

They are members of the order Crocodilia, which also includes caimans, gharials and alligators. 

There are 13 species of crocodiles, so there are many different sizes of crocodile. The smallest crocodile is the dwarf crocodile. It grows to about 5.6 feet (1.7 meters) in length and weighs 13 to 15 pounds (6 to 7 kilograms). The largest crocodile is the saltwater crocodile. The largest one ever found was 20.24 feet (6.17 m) long. They can weigh up to 2,000 pounds (907 kg).

Despite being classified as “reptiles”, crocodiles (and all crocodilians, including alligators) are more closely related to dinosaurs and birds (which are actually avian dinosaurs) than to most animals classified as reptiles.

The largest African crocodile is the Nile crocodile. It is the second-largest crocodile species: only Australia’s saltwater crocodile is bigger! The Nile crocodile is one of Africa’s most dangerous animals.
Crocodiles are carnivores, which mean they eat only meat. In the wild, they feast on fish, birds, frogs and crustaceans. At the zoo, they eat small animals that have already been killed for them, such as rats, fish or mice. They also eat live locusts.
Crocodiles really do produce tears. Because, while eating, they swallow too much air, which gets in touch with lachrymal glands (glands that produce tears) and forces tears to flow. But it’s not actually crying. The term “Crocodile tears” (and equivalents in many other languages) refers to a false, insincere display of emotion, such as a hypocrite crying fake tears of grief. It is derived from an ancient anecdote that crocodiles weep in order to lure their prey, or that they cry for the victims they are eating, first told in the Bibliotheca by Photios I, who was the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople. This tale was first spread widely in English in the stories of the Travels of Sir John Mandeville in the 14th century and appears in several of William Shakespeare’s plays.

we support the goals and beliefs of other charity foundations and would like to join them!

Stand with us in condemning the killing of wildlife for trophies, both in the United States and around the world. Pledge to do what you can to end this cruel and unsportsmanlike pastime.